The Virtual CMO

Implementing a CEX - Customer and Employee Experience Strategy with Jason Bradshaw

September 02, 2021 Eric Dickmann, Jason Bradshaw Season 6 Episode 7
The Virtual CMO
Implementing a CEX - Customer and Employee Experience Strategy with Jason Bradshaw
Show Notes Transcript

In episode 88, host Eric Dickmann interviews Jason Bradshaw. Jason is an entrepreneur, global guru on customer service, award-winning executive, keynote speaker, CMO, and Best-Selling Author of "It’s All About CEX."  He created his first business at 14, selling telecommunications and computer equipment in the Australian regional city of Toowoomba.  Jason tested and implemented strategies for improving the experience in a variety of sectors, including telecommunications, retail, media, finance, automotive, health, and not-for-profit.

A cornerstone of Jason’s career has been an unwavering commitment to improving the lives of customers and employees. During his time in the telecommunications industry, he implemented ideas for improving customer experience in a number of verticals by over 100% in retail and media. His initiatives to improve efficiencies by focusing on the customer and employee experience saved tens of millions of dollars in a matter of months and improved employee retention by double digits year over year. Additionally, he has led transformational programs resulting in tens of millions in revenue improvement.

Jason Bradshaw’s "It's All About CEX" breaks experience down into its core components - success, ease, and connection - and shows you how to get the most mileage out of each one. This book reveals how to generate positive experiences for your customers and employees, win their loyalty, and maximize your profits in the process.

For show notes and a  list of resources mentioned in this episode, please visit: https://fiveechelon.com/implementing-cex-customer-employee-experience-strategy-s6ep7/


A fractional CMO can help build out a comprehensive marketing strategy and execute targeted campaigns designed to increase awareness and generate demand for your business...without the expense of a full-time hire.

The Five Echelon Group - Fractional CMO and strategic marketing advisory services designed for SMBs looking to grow. Learn more at: 

https://fiveechelon.com


Eric Dickmann:

Welcome to The Virtual CMO podcast. I'm your host, Eric Dickmann. In this podcast, we have conversations with marketing professionals who share the strategies, tactics, and mindset you can use to improve the effectiveness of your marketing activities and grow your business. Hey Jason, good day and welcome to The Virtual CMO Podcast. I'm so glad you could join us today.

Jason Bradshaw:

Hi Eric. It's great to be with you. And I have to say it's not often you hear someone from the US say good day. So good day back to you.

Eric Dickmann:

Yeah well, thank you very much. The wonderful world of technology allows us to connect across the world. One of the things I've loved about doing this podcast is I've been able to chat with thought leaders and experts from all over the world. And so I'm really excited to have you on today because we're going to get a chance to talk about one of my favorite topics, which is all around customer experience design. You know, this is just such a timely topic, and one of the things that I think is so important for businesses to understand is that they really do have to design their customer experience, right? It's not just about the products and services that they sell, but it's the whole experience from how you market your product, to how you sell it, to how you service it after the fact. When you start to engage with clients and you talk to customers about the whole idea of creating a strategy around this, how do you frame it for them?

Jason Bradshaw:

Well, I tend to look at research and Qualtrics is recently released some research that shows that 30% of consumers will change who they do business with based on just one bad experience. So the question I ask is, can you afford to lose 30% of your customers today? And most business leaders will say no. But the really interesting thing is over the last decade, CEOs across the world have been asked, you know, what are your top five, top 10 priorities for the next 12 months? The next three years? They all say customer experience. Yet so many fail to invest in it and invest in it in a tangible way. And what I mean by that is not just throwing cash at it, you know? Any Fortune 500 company can throw cash out and have throwing cash at improving the customer experience. But it's like putting lipstick on a pig. If you don't change the culture, if you don't embed the process, if you don't make all of your decisions around the promises you make to your customers intentionally, then it literally is just that. A promise that's empty and leads to mistakes, which 30% of customers will go. just so you know, over 80% of customers will recommend you if they've had a great experience. You know, I'm not sure how to be on that 80% scale than the 30% one.

Eric Dickmann:

Yeah, and it seems like there are so many opportunities to create an enhanced customer experience that just get missed. I'm sure we've all had the experience of calling into our bank or financial center or a utility company. You know, these classic cases of these huge call centers that seem to do nothing but frustrate the people that call into them. And yet they've had years to perfect what they're doing, and they seem to have made little progress. In fact, the biggest change that I've noticed over the past five years or so is that they always want to take you to a survey at the end of the call, which does absolutely nothing to improve the experience. Cause they're not going to change anything based on my survey results.

Jason Bradshaw:

Well, I'd argue that many of them don't change anything based on all of the survey results. It's absolutely important to ask customers how well you're doing or otherwise. But you have to ask at the right point. You shouldn't over survey. Sometimes you get five or six surveys from the one interaction. Uh, because different people in the company want to know different things. Now there's really only maybe three or four questions you need to ask. The first is, did we get it right? And if the answer is no. How can I get it right? How can I make it better? And, you know, I always advocate how do we get it right for you? Did we make it easy for you? And then when you do business with us again now, Obviously, you want those questions to suit how you interact in the language of your company. But if you get the answer to those three questions and you actually take action on what customers are saying, imagine the growth that your business is going to have. We are so busy collecting data, we failed to act. We have to act on the data. And so that's why I say ask questions. Absolutely. But just ask three or four, the reality is you've probably only got the attention span to focus on three or four. And if you nail a culture that is absolutely focused on improving, then your business will grow. You know, with every business out there makes promises and then they deliver something. That gap between the promise and the delivery is the opportunity, the opportunity to grow. And with growth comes, everything that business owners enjoy profit. Right. So, uh, Look, I'm absolutely with you that people ask too many surveys, but they do have a place that you have to use.

Eric Dickmann:

One of the things that we focus on a lot on this podcast is small and mid-sized businesses who are really trying to grow their business. And many businesses seem to follow a path. You know, they start out and they build their product or they build their service. So that's where all the focus of the company is going, right? On creating that core part of their business. And then once the product is ready to be released or the service ready to be released, then they focus on ramping up their marketing and sales activities to actually sell the product. And now the product is in people's hands. Now we have to service it. Now we have to have people to service, whatever we've released out into the world, but all of these things tend to lag. It seems the one mistake that companies make over and over again is they're reactive, not proactive to building out the customer service experience. So I'd love to get your thoughts, maybe start like on this first stage when you're marketing, when you're presenting your products and services to the world, and trying to make it easy for customers to buy.

Jason Bradshaw:

Well, yeah, I think most marketers, because look at their job as you know, leading to a sale, how do I create a sale? How do I create enough desire and interest in our product to sell something? and talk about how can I start serving our audience? How can I start delivering value to my audience that may or may not lead to a sale? And so no work that I did with Volkswagen group Australia, well, you made it really simple for them consumers to get a valuation on their car that they already own, that they'd be trading in, in the process. Now you might go, why do you want to give a customer that information before they've even committed to buying one of your cars? Well, an informed consumer is a consumer that can make a decision. And if that customer's journey is to trade in their car. They might not have any idea around what their car's worth and once they know what it's worth, they might trade up. They might go to a higher spec vehicle. They might decide to buy two vehicles. But it doesn't matter. It's about that value creation that you make at the beginning, because then you started that relationship. And that relationship means that you can continue a conversation with them that hopefully leads to a sale. But so often marketers are thinking about how do I get that lead? How do I get that person to buy today? Let's just start creating value for customers, making it really easy for customers to have a relationship with us. That then lets us sell to them at the right time. Because the goal of an organization surely is to have a customer for a lifetime, not for a transaction. And when you're coming from a customer centric point of view, you're thinking about a lifetime, not a transaction. So I come back to, in my book I talk about making things easy for customers. You know, there's some good colleagues of mine that have written books around the power of convenience and being frictionless and. The easier. I fundamentally believe that that if we design an experience for consumers that is adding value, that is really easy for them to get that value both before the sale and after the sale and that's key, then you'll create a lifetime customer. And that's where your cost of acquisition, which is another metric that now, every marketer talks about will start to decrease. Because your cheapest acquisition is one that's been referred to by an existing customer. And so. you know, I talked about creating value before the purchase, but it's also important to create value after the purchase, I was talking to a potential client earlier this week and they were explaining to me that on their website, they're an e-commerce company. And on their website, they sell a range of products that they effectively manufacture and distribute themselves as well as resells of other products. As you could imagine the profit margins are different based on those products. And this individual was telling me about a customer service situation where a consumer bought a third-party product through their website. And had had 30 emails between their call center and the consumer about this product. Now the consumer obviously was happy with the service because they came back and said, I'd like to buy this product. And that product was worth about six grand. So their first product, they spend a couple of hundred. After 30 emails they wanted to buy a $6,000 product. And the customer service agent turned around and said, we don't have it in stock.

Eric Dickmann:

Oh no.

Jason Bradshaw:

And the situation ended., The relationship ended. Now. We could spend hours talking about why did it take 30 emails, but obviously there was some value being created there to keep the consumer coming back and wanting to buy again. But because the organization and every part of the organization, wasn't completely centered on making it easy for the customer to have success, we had a break point. And that's where you get the 30% of consumers leaving after just one bad experience. So.

Eric Dickmann:

Yes.

Jason Bradshaw:

with that example, there was a great opportunity to continue to add value that would have led to more sales. But it's beyond that. You know I'm using a Sony camera on our broadcast today. Sony has never contacted me since I purchased the camera for any reason, other than to try and sell me something.Imagine in Sony sent me information once every three months, which would be less frequent than how often they try to sell me, helping me get more out of the camera. You know, the day I unboxed it. it was a glorious day. But it's probably got a million features I don't know how to use, a million features that would make me look better on camera. The camera is specifically designed for live blogging and situations like this. They could create a relationship with me. That means that I'm going to spend more with them over time because I know I'm going to maximize the value of that purchase. And it's a cycle. We as marketers need to create value first, make it really easy for customers to get that value and have success. And we will succeed and grow our businesses by doing so.

Eric Dickmann:

Yeah, I love it. It's a great point. There are so many things that we purchase and you have to register or maybe you bought them through an online site and you never hear from these companies again, unless they want to sell you something, which typically they do. And often you're usually unsubscribing because you get so much junk email. I also think it's interesting, you know, your experience at Volkswagen, you know, car dealerships are one of the highest friction businesses, you know, according to surveys. You know, people do not like the experience of buying a car. And yet you've got these automakers that have been around for years, they've had ample opportunity to improve the experience, but they're not really doing all that much, it seems. It seems what's happening is the upstarts are coming in and allowing you to order a car from your phone and have it delivered into your driveway. It's the pandemic forced some of this to happen, but still people dread going in there. And oftentimes I look at the car dealer experience and can sort of relate that to other businesses. They are trying to push you into a sales process that works for them. Not necessarily a sales process that works for you. And I see a lot of businesses making that mistake.

Jason Bradshaw:

And it's because businesses are designed around silos. The sales team is responsible for sales, they don't care what the accounting team does. Their metric is not how well the invoice goes out, their metric is, did they get the sales order? You know, the accounting team's metric is how probably aged debtors. You know where is those common metrics that everyone in the organization is responsible for? You know quite often I get asked by people, who's responsible for customer service or customer experience, then I say, well, everyone, of course. And then I get this blank look back. But I can't copy everybody, it needs to be a department. And then I say, well, who's responsible for sales? And they're like, well, the sales department, but really everyone should be selling. Yes I agree, everyone in the organization should be selling through the experience that they deliver. You think about your favorite movie and last time you spoke to a friend about your favorite movie, you were probably talking about the actors, and the characters, and how will they act it? They're the employees that, they're not the business owner, they're the employee, in 95% of cases, delivering the experience, the experience that your employees deliver is what your business lives and dies on. And now whether it be the automotive industry or Walmart, we have to get focused on solving problems for customers, but at the same time, making it really easy for our employees to deliver a consistent experience. It's no great. It's nothing great about going into a store virtually or in person and having a fantastic experience today. And then going in the next day and having a terrible one. Because that terrible one could be the one I leave. People want to trust their experience. Why is Amazon so popular?

Eric Dickmann:

Yeah, Consistency,

Jason Bradshaw:

Consistency. I say to people that creating a emotional human connection with people is absolute paramount for creating longterm success with customers. And then I tend to say and Amazon does it brilliantly, and I get challenged. And I understand I get challenged, but Amazon's online. You know, most, most of the time you don't speak to anyone. You know on the phone or online, you just place your order, and it turns up the next day, I'm like that's trust and trust is a powerful human emotion. And why do we trust Amazon? Because they consistently get it right. They do what they say they're going to do. And I think organizations, and this is the trap that a lot of small businesses and medium businesses get into. They think they need to be a hundred times better than Walmart or a hundred times better than at and T or whoever the big competitor is. No. They just have to nail delivering on their promise consistently. Because people will buy consistency and pay more for it than an inconsistent experience that puts them at risk. When I'm talking to my mortgage broker, I don't want him to say today that I can have a million dollars and tomorrow I can have nothing. want him to give me a consistent answer and deliver on that promise. Yeah, everyone's willing to pay for that. We just need to focus on being consistent and small business, medium business, they actually have the greatest potential to deliver on this because they have less people to get focused and running in the same direction.

Eric Dickmann:

Hey, it's Eric here and we'll be right back to the podcast. But first, are you ready to grow, scale, and take your marketing to the next level? If so, The Five Echelon Group's Virtual CMO consulting service may be a great fit for you. We can help build a strategic marketing plan for your business and manage its execution, step-by-step. We'll focus on areas like how to attract more leads. How to create compelling messaging that resonates with your ideal customers. How to strategically package and position your products and services. How to increase lead conversion, improve your margins, and scale your business. To find out more about our consulting offerings and schedule a consultation, go to fiveechelon.com and click on Services. Now back to the podcast. I think that's so true. You know, when we talk about an example like Volkswagen, you could argue that they have limited incentive to make their process better. Because if you want a Volkswagen, there's really only one place that you can go to get it, right? You have to go to your Volkswagen dealer. Whereas if you, I know you had some experience working at Target as well. So if you take Target, Walmart, and Amazon, you know, any of these big box retailers, they're selling the same goods and services as their competitor is selling. So what they've got to do is they've got to provide an environment, an experience, a price that's better than their competitors. All that has to come together for them to win market share. And I think sometimes smaller businesses, they think they're competing a little bit in a niche where they don't have as much competition. So they don't feel the need to invest in customer experience the same way that these big retailers do who are fighting against each other to win that customer.

Jason Bradshaw:

And I think it's important to actually take a step back and say, do you want to be in that war that Walmart's having with Target and Amazon? You know, there's not necessarily profit in that war, you know? Think about you walk into target and you can get a. $5 towel, $5 beach towel. Walk into Walmart and get a $3 beach towel. They probably are produced in the same factory or the factories neighboring each other. probably the same quality, not discernible difference between them. Yet, one's $3 and one's $5. And if that's the only thing that's going to create my decision to buy, well Target's gonna make more money out of me and Walmart is going to make less, and Walmart's going to have to sell a lot more to make money. Now, the alternative is to compete on experience. Now, when I was 14 years of age, I started my very first business selling computers and telecommunications products. And yeah, when I was interviewed by a current affair, I was asked, you know, how are you going to compete against the big guys in town? And I said, I'm not. I can't compete with them on price, but I can compete on service because it's the only lever I can pull. I don't have enough customers to get the scale, to get the prices down. But I do have a passion for making my customers love what they buy, and serving them well. Every small or medium business can have that same passion and compete on something that matters, the experience, how we enrich people's lives, than just on price. Because if all you're competing is on price, as soon as Walmart drops to $3, you've got a choice, do I sell less or do I drop to $3 to try and stay competitive? Or do I go to two, where does it end? No, it was Southwest airlines. Funny enough is, a great example I think of not playing a price war. Now people might go, but hang on, their prices are cheap. Nope, I disagree.

Eric Dickmann:

They're really not. No.

Jason Bradshaw:

You know by the time you add baggage, and all the various things that you probably need, they're around the same price as America and All United, but they are absolutely famous not for their price, they're famous for the experience that they deliver consistently. You know they talk about prices and marketing can make. They're real rhetoric, the real thing that they deliver is an experience, you know? Go into Barnes and Noble bookstore, you'll see a dozen books talking about the Southwest way, how Southwest have revolutionized the airline industry. What did they do? They cared about the customer and they deliver the right experience every day unlike some other airlines that are famous for breaking a guitars on runways and things like that.

Eric Dickmann:

The annual survey that they put out that are the top brands in the world. The top brands are rarely the ones that are ranked based on the lowest price products that they sell, right? Many times they're luxury brands, they're brands that, that price their products that are premium. But they deliver that experience that you're talking about, which is so critical. And you know, one of the things we talk about a lot on this show is the power of positive reviews, whether those are reviews that are showing up on Google or Yelp, or any of these various review services. And just the power of referrals when somebody likes your product or service and is willing to talk to a friend or a colleague about it and say, Hey, you should look into this product. That's priceless, you know? When you're talking about marketing, that kind of brand trust is really valuable. And how do you encourage companies to further develop that?

Jason Bradshaw:

First of all, I think you just need to be really genuine about why you're asking for the review. Don't incentivize the review with that cash for comment. And I don't think that you really get valuable, transparent reviews when you do that. But I think if you love our experience,, we'd love you to tell the story or share the story and make it easy for customers to share the story. So we talked about the million surveys that go out there. You know first of all, if you've got more than five questions, change that. But your feature could be, do you want to share your story? Click Yes and we'll post it to various sites on your behalf. There's tools out there that let you do that. I think the first step is to ask, you know? Would you be willing to recommend? The second step is to ask at the right time. And the right time is not when they've just bought the product. Now, I would encourage you to go back to my Sony camera example. Now if Sony wrote to me three months after I'd had the camera, six months after I had the camera, after they had been continuing the relationship, delivering value, making me get the absolute most out of the camera, if they then sent me an email saying, Hey, we'd love you to shoot a video with your camera telling us how much you love it or telling us about your experience, then the amount of user generated content that that would create would be phenomenal. My recommendation would be more meaningful because it wouldn't be, I've just unboxed it and I you know, what would I say? I unboxed it, I turned up on time, and, oh, it's a camera.. But after, you know three or six months, if I get asked the question, then I can like, it's fantastic. Here are the three things I love about it. People actually see themselves using the product, as opposed to just buying the product. And ultimately that's what we want, you know? Businesses will say that they're in the business of selling product. Well, a product that sits in a cupboard, doesn't get your repeat sale and doesn't get your referral business. You need your consumers to use your product because the use is part of the marketing and then lead that into advocacy advocacy in some way.

Eric Dickmann:

That's interesting to me because you know, we used to talk about planned obsolescence and how product sort of depreciates over time. And then, you know technology entered the game and you've got things like your mobile phone which gets a software update every year, which actually makes that phone more valuable than it was the year before. And that only goes on for so long, right? The underlying technology changes and at some point you need to swap it out for a newer one, but it's being improved. And now that's happening in the auto industry. You know, in the past, if you wanted the latest technology upgrade or something like that, you had to buy the next model year of car. Now cars are becoming upgradable and they're sending over the air updates and making that car better than it was the day that you bought it. And so I love this because companies are now investing back into the products that you've already purchased to add additional value. And so they're trying to find ways for you to get more out of what you've already purchased and build that loyalty for future purchases.

Jason Bradshaw:

Every year when Apple releases their new operating system, the phones from five or six years can get that operating system. But there's always one or two features that the hardware can't support. It can only be supported on the new phone. People don't get an app for that. They are still genuinely happy that they've had their phone enhanced, and the more people that see iPhones walking around being used, the more people that want the product. And so I think this whole notion of,that. Tesla really kicked off from an auto perspective of being able to continue to add value through updating your vehicle post-purchase for free, mind you. It's a great way to create that relationship because the more Teslas on the road, the more people will want a Tesla. It's as simple as that. People are trained to follow the majority. And so the number one car on the road is the number one visited website. Why? Because people see the brand all the time, and if this many people are driving it, that must be trustworthy, right? Same with Tesla. The more people that are on the road with Tesla, oh, it's no longer just for the early adopters. Look at how many people are driving and I hear they do updates and isn't that different? And it creates this conversation. It creates a reason to have a conversation. When was the last time you sat down at your dinner table with friends and said, oh, my BMW had an update last night and now it can turn corners by itself. You can't. But if you have a Tesla, you would. And this is very powerful. A Super Bowl lab doesn't get you that sort of referral and trust, instant trust. No, it's those conversations that creating value, genuine value lead to. And you know, if you're customer centric, if you're focused on your employee experience and customer experience, and you're constantly saying to yourself, how can I make it easier? How can I add value? How can I help the customer be successful? Not just in buying the product, but in using the product. That's through differentiation and differentiation creates a value clip that allows you to have repeat and referral business profitably without all the hassle, and you know constantly trying to find new people to fill up the marketing funnel.

Eric Dickmann:

It's so interesting to me. I drive a Jeep and it's got a navigation system in it. But of course what Jeep would like me to do is come in once a year to buy a map upgrade that they load into the car for you know, $200 or something like this. And the upgrade will still be nothing like the quality that I could get from Google maps or Apple maps. But yet they want to charge me for it. Just think of how the tables would be turned if once a year I got in the mail a free upgrade from them and said, here, we're enhancing your entertainment system or upgrading your maps. It's a small expense for them. But think about the loyalty that that could impart on the vehicle and my relationship with it, because I felt like I had something that was updated and said now feeling like they are ripping me off trying to update something that is diminishing in its usefulness.

Jason Bradshaw:

Yeah, absolutely. And if you think about what Tesla's doing, I know BMW has started doing this as well, that you can subscribe to live maps. And so you don't have, you're still spending the $200, but you're getting the latest information in

real time. When you need it most, it's no good having a map that was 12 months old. When you are lost in the middle of a city that's been exploding in its growth or changing its roads. I had a map once telling me to turn right, so I turned right. Had lots of cars that's just Honking their

Jason Bradshaw:

horn at me. And. I'm like, what are you doing? Well the next thing I got pulled over because I turned right down the one way street that they'd switched the street around. But yeah, my car, my map said to me that the police didn't carewhat the map said to me. Yes, I should have been more aware of the signs, but those sorts of experiences, when I get that reminder to go in and pay for my maps, that just says, why?

Eric Dickmann:

Right, exactly.

Jason Bradshaw:

But. If you're going to Tesla or BMW is a live subscription, then you don't have that fear, right? I think, you know the reason people come up with these, I call them gotchas, you know? You've got you bought sat navs. So it's only logical that you're going to have to update the maps and well, you have to come to the dealership to do that or you have to. You know, come into the store to do that. And there'll be a fee because you're using up some of my time. That becomes a big grudge purchase. You People aren't going to sit down at dinner or at the water cooler at work and go you know what I was so excited about, I spent an extra $200 this week just to get my maps that I'd already paid a few thousand doubles to get when I bought the car. It's crazy and you know, of course it's not just the automotive industry that does this. It's right in many industries and we need to start looking for those gotcha moments and ways to add value because that $200, is that really what you want to base and build your business on? If your organization's profit relies on forcing customers to buy something, they don't want to buy and that in fact, their phones actually have a better feature on them, then you're going to constantly be challenged.

Eric Dickmann:

You've got to think about that lifetime customer value. I know this all is a very passionate topic for you so much so that you've written a book about itWhat inspired you to write the book and yeah, tell me about that journey of just being an author to this book.

Jason Bradshaw:

I'm in the midst of writing my second book.

Eric Dickmann:

Good for you.

Jason Bradshaw:

I thought it would have been easier than the first one, but apparently all my bad habits continue. But I have spent my lifetime focused on customer, employee experience and worked in some amazing organizations. And I can remember as a 14 year old, obviously not a typical 14 year old, but I was reading a book called In Pursuit of Wow by Tom Peters and now as my career continued, I kept seeing all these books and kept reading books and they were great books and I've recommended many of them. But what I thought was missing was a book that brought together both the power of customer and employee experience. But in a really practical, humbled way, so that if you're the first time team manager or the CEO, you could read the book and get value out of it. Now, I've read and I'm sure many of us have read books that you know, we might've enjoyed, but they end up sitting on a bookshelf collecting dust somewhere. What I really wanted to do was write a book that was practical, that when someone put it down, they could go and start improving the experience, the lives of the people that they live, work, and serve. That's what led me to writing the book. It's All About CEX, C E X: The Essential Guide to Customer and Employee Experience. And like I said, just really practical examples based on decades of leading teams in this space across seven different industries to really just help people make a difference. No. I mentioned earlier that, you know, companies don't need to be 10 or 20% better than their competitors. The key is just to be consistently 1% better. Than your competitors. And many industries that just being consistent is that 1% right. So this book is about helping you get ahead of the curve, get really clear about what your promises and what great looks like so that you can focus on delivering it.

Eric Dickmann:

I love that. We've talked about a number of big brands during the show today, but oftentimes it's the smaller companies that are the innovators. They're the ones who are more nimble and able to move where some of these big lumbering giants take a long time. And so even if you're in a highly competitive marketplace, there is room for innovation. There is room to really improve that customer and employee experience to really deliver that 1% value that you're talking about. So this is so applicable to our target audience, and I'll make sure that we have all the links to that in the show notes. You know as we wrap up the conversation today, I would just love it if you could tell people where they could find the book, where they could find more about you online. We talked before the show about you doing a lot of keynote speeches and things like that. Hopefully that's starting to ramp back up so people may be able to see her in person as well.

Jason Bradshaw:

Yeah, absolutely love connecting with people at events. It absolutely fuels me and to hear the stories and to have those conversations, but the whole way conversations as I call them that hopefully lead to individuals getting back to the workplace and taking action. Doing something to improve experience. The easiest way for people to connect with me is at jasonsbradshaw.com. Really important to keep that S in the middle- jasonsbradshaw.com. Anyone that is listening can go to the website and download my Top 10, 6 trends or predictions for 2021. As well as get two chapters of my book for free. The absolute easiest way to get a copy of my book for your listeners is on barnesandnoble.com or amazon.com. It will get to you faster than I can ship it to you from Australia. And of course, I have a regular newsletter and some other content, so I'd love people to sign up and follow my journey.

Eric Dickmann:

This is great. This is such an important topic, and it's really something that with a little bit of work and focus and getting everybody inside the company involved in a single mission of providing that great experience that you can really make some pretty dramatic changes in your business, and you can see the growth that follows. So I really appreciate you coming on the show today to talk about this super interesting topic.

Jason Bradshaw:

Thanks Eric! Absolutely loved being on the show with you.

Eric Dickmann:

Great, thanks. We'll have that all that linked up in the show notes. Talk to you again soon. Thank you for joining us on this episode of The Virtual CMO podcast. For more episodes, go to fiveechelon.com/podcast to subscribe through your podcast player of choice. And if you'd like to develop consistent lead flow and a highly effective marketing strategy, visit fiveechelon.com to learn more about our Virtual CMO consulting services.